Blog

2012 was UK’s second wettest in recorded history

January 21, 2013 at 11:12 am

2012 turned out to be the UK’s second wettest year in recorded history and statistics are pointing to a continuation of this kind of excessive rainfall. The top 5 wettest years since recording began (1910) have all occurred since the turn of the century. It’s not just the UK that’s affected either; 2012 saw severe flooding in Thailand, India and China.

Ironically the wettest April in recorded history came hot on the heels of one of the driest March periods which had prompted hosepipe bans in the south east due to low groundwater levels. At the beginning of 2012 everybody was talking about water shortages, at the beginning of 2013 farmers are operating in flooded areas and the picture has essentially reversed. The situation it seems, swings from drought to flood with alarming rapidity; this is a new situation for the UK and one it is going to have to take steps to manage.

Those most affected by the unpredictable weather are of course Britain’s farmers who struggled last year to make use of inundated fields. Their woes continue into 2013 as they face exacerbated feed prices due to these same shortages. The financial cost to the agricultural industry is estimated to be over one billion pounds. Consumers obviously feel their pain through an increase in prices, scarcity of certain items and a drop in quality. Passenger train routes were also severely affected in the south west with many services completely suspended at peak time, right before Christmas.

Both independent experts and the Government state that UK water needs to be managed more effectively. As we are now facing both an excess and a lack of water due to unpredictable weather patterns solutions lie in more effective storage and drainage. We can expect to see widespread investment in such things as reservoirs, sophisticated urban drainage and domestic water harvesting in the home.

Posted in Uncategorized |

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *